ITCs in the Educational System of Burundi…

A few months ago I received an email from Paolo Brunello, who had read this blog and was planning to use Net-Map in his PhD thesis. He is working on the Burundian educational system and while training teachers to become system administrators of newly installed PCs, he wants to evaluate the relevance of ITCs in developing countries. Some questions that he posed in this respect:

“Why should teachers and administrative folks bother implementing ICTs in their everyday practice? What will they gain? What may they lose? How will power be redistributed in this ecosystem as a consequence of this implementation?”

He promised to give us a more detailed account of his first experience, but I would like to share his first impression and also show the great Net-Map figurines and influence tower pieces he had produced locally. cimg0013_3

I think this picture can be a useful source of inspiration for those of you who want to produce and use the tool in your respective locations.

And now some of Paolo’s excitement:

“I’m glad to tell you that today I’ve tried out for the first time your
toolbox, with my group of 30 people (splitted in 3 subgroups), and
following your step-by-step manual things have gone pretty well.
Here you are some pictures that I have quickly selected to give you an
idea, but I will do a more exhaustive summary soon for my thesis. As
you can see, I’ve used some 50 figures (+150 discs) that I had ask a
local wood craftsman to carve for me. I was amazed to see how people got increasingly involved to the point they were almost forgetting lunch! :-)”

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