Can you make it more playful and more serious?

picture by Donald Zolan (and, by the way, not my child) http://abstract.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/430791/

picture by Donald Zolan (and, by the way, not my child) http://abstract.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/430791/

What? Everything.

Keith McCandles of Liberating Structures asked me this question when I shared my instructions for the use of network pattern cards with him. He proposed to make it more serious by inviting a group to explore a shared problem and to make it more playful by asking: “What is the pattern you would need to choose if you really wanted to mess this up?” And only after that the group would pick the pattern they think will make them succeed. This follows the idea of the liberating structure TRIZ.

His question stuck with me – way beyond the concrete discussion of how to facilitate a group experience. Now it has a place of honor on a post-it on my office wall: “Can I make it more playful and more serious?” How would my life and work be, if I made it more playful and serious.

When I am with my kids, could I have more playful openness and laugh more about things that just aren’t that important AND have the mindful focus of someone who knows that this is serious, that these few years of closeness run by quicker than you think and that every moment matters.

At my work, what would happen if I played and improvised more freely, inviting myself, my colleagues, our clients to use play for experiencing the changes we aim for in an nonthreatening environment – it’s only play after all. And what if at the same time I was much more serious about my aspiration, much braver about naming and claiming the changes I really care about, allowing myself to really care about them?

What are the things in your life that could be transformed by being more playful and more serious? Are you taking steps in that direction already?

Involuntarily airborne dog explains complexity

In a recent discussion on the marvelous Knowledge Management for Development email list, Ueli Scheuermeier recounted this great explanation of the difference between complicated and complex, which he had first heard from Irving Borwick:

“If you put a football on the penalty point and then have a guy kick it towards the goal, that is a complicated process whereby through the application of knowledge of physics etc. you can actually predict the trajectory of the football. But there are many variables that make it a rather complicated data-collection and calculation. But it’s still complicated not complex.
If, however, you put a dog there on the penalty point and a guy comes along and kicks it, you can never predict what will happen next. All you know is the general environment and the framework in which something will happen, but what exactly will happen you don’t know. That’s complexity. It usually comes up when living people (in this case an animal) and their decisions and reactions are involved and influence an outcome. When humans are involved, outcomes are never predictable. That’s complexity”.