Rare opportunity: Learn Net-Map in the UK!

How about hanging out at the beach, learning Net-Map and meeting about 1000 highly intelligent social network analysis experts of every discipline, who do everything from crazy complex quantitative stuff to anthropologically observing network development on the ground? The Sunbelt Conference of the International Network of Social Network Analysis (INSNA) is an inspiring event, whether you are a beginner or a full-blown SNA genius and one of the great things about it is that it always starts with two days of training workshops, before the three days of 700 talks in parallel start. A great way of learning for example some of the complex software, which is painful to learn alone at home. Ah, and another great thing is that they insist on always finding a location close to the sea. They alternate between the US and the rest of the world and this year the conference will be in Brighton, UK.

This year Net-Map will be present there in a three hour hands on training in the first part of the conference and we will have two sessions for applied network knowledge which will be heavily leaning toward Net-Map. Though my talk will not be about Net-Map but about the new network pattern cards which I am developing. I would love to see you there. The last time I have taught Net-Map in Europe was the Summer School in Italy, and that was in 2011. A few spots are still available for the Net-Map training workshop, so if you are interested just go ahead and sign up and I will see you there. Together with a whole bunch of other Net-Mappers.

Session on “Applying Network Knowledge” at the Sunbelt XXXV

by  at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ / Department of Environmental Politics

Would you be interested in presenting your Net-Map work at the at the Sunbelt XXXV, Brighton, UK, June 23– June 28, 2015, the largest annual conference of Social Network Analysis, organized by the International Network for Social Network Analysis (INSNA)?

Our proposal for a session on “Applying Network Knowledge” during the Sunbelt XXXV has been accepted and we are encouraging people with interesting presentations on the subject to submit their abstracts (see conference website for details).

A bit more about the theme of the session:
Governance approaches for example in public health, education or policy making typically involve many actors from different domains who are not all connected by hierarchy and whose behavior cannot easily be mandated. Thus, successful governance approaches rely on networks of actors who collaborate and on the quality of their collaboration. To understand success factors or governance failures and to improve existing structures it is thus crucial to understand the underlying formal and informal social networks. In many cases Social Network Analysis (SNA) has been used to provide answers to these questions. This session contains presentations of cases that made use of SNA knowledge in divers situations, using participatory, learning oriented network mapping exercises.

If you are interested:

Contact Jennifer directly (jennifer.hauck@ufz.de) and tell her about your possible session.

Check the Sunbelt website for their call for abstracts, submit your abstract and indicate that you want to be part of the “Applying Network Knowledge” session.

Do your networks own you – or do you own them?

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Does the bear eat you or do you eat the bear (Polar Bear Family and Me by Gordan Buchanan)

Does the bear eat you or do you eat the bear?

Coming back from the largest meeting of social network analysts, the Sunbelt Conference of the International Network of Social Network Analysis (INSNA) I realize that my approach to this question might be different from the mainstream in the field. Most researchers who are interested in social networks will ask a variation of the following questions:

  • How does the network you are embedded in determine what you get (depending on research interest the “what” can be as diverse as “money”, “weight gain” and “HIV/AIDS”)? Or:
  • How is your network determined by who you are (looking at the network differences between men and women, rich and poor, sick and healthy, new and old staff etc.)

I guess, that’s what most researchers do, looking at how one thing is determined by something else. I am much more interested in the practical and proactive question:

  • Once you understand your network, what can you do about it?

Network researchers make a compelling case (backed up with a lot of evidence) that network structures do indeed influence what you can achieve or what risks will come your way. And it is obvious that different people have networks are structured differently. But wouldn’t it be great to get a better understanding of what individuals and groups can (and cannot) do to improve their network structure and content to be happier, achieve more of what they want, get out of painful, limiting and dysfunctional network relations?

Have you been able to change your networks? Why did you do it and how? What was difficult? What was easy? Did it change what you can give and get? I’d love to hear from you.

And if you want to find out what happens to the man in the glass box as he is visited by a hungry ice bear (picture above), you will find an amazing video here: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/01/04/polar-bear-arctic-gordon-buchanan_n_2410791.html

February 18th-23rd: All the Network Analysis Gurus and a Net-Map training in Tampa, Florida

T’is the time of the year again. The International Network for Social Network Analysis (INSNA) is hosting their annual Sunbelt conference, 750+ paralell talks, training workshops in all kinds of network tools, a rainy Florida beach and all the big names will be there. One highlight is always the “hospitality suite” – which feels like a grab-a-beer and talk nonsense kind of student party, only that all those people whose brilliant papers you admire (if you are into social network analysis) are doing the beer-grabbing and chilling…

I am still amazed at the wide range of issues that you can tackle using network analysis, from the prediction of road-side bombs in Iraq to the hat-trading and cheating behavior of people who play online games. I will teach a three hour Net-Map intro class on the afternoon of Tuesday 18th of February and otherwise just go with the flow and be inspired. Hope to see some of you there. If you do come and are a reader of this blog, please, contact me so we can have coffee.